Nurses Protest at the White House to Demand Protective Standards and Honor Fallen Peers

Nurses gather in front of the White House to demand PPE from the President, Congress and other government entities + honor fallen nurses who succumb to COVID-19.

WHO and Partners Call for Urgent Investment in Nurses

The Covid-19 pandemic underscores the urgent need to strengthen the global health workforce. A new report, The State of the World’s Nursing 2020, provides an in-depth look at the largest component of the health workforce. Learn more about these findings on our blog!

Praying Nurse Covid Death in Service America

The Nurse Link for Death-in-Service Compensation for US Nurses, Doctors & Healthcare Workers

Countless nurses on the front lines have been infected and several have died in service due to the lack of PPE, below standard working conditions and impossible patient surges. With such conditions, a resounding fear amongst providers has been their own mortality and the financial impact it may their families- amid other concerns. This fear has kept some away from the frontline and is definitely a large stressor to those who are working tirelessly.

Thank You to Nurses Everywhere!

In light of the novel coronavirus outbreak, The Nurse Link would like to thank all nurses and healthcare providers at the bedside and on the front line.

We are equally grateful for nursing students, new grad and soon to be new grad nurses who have volunteered to assist in this time of crisis.

Your commitment to the field gives us hope and a fighting chance. This pandemic has and will continue to require a collaborative effort of healthcare workers amidst challenging factors and ever-changing protocols.

As an organization we plan to provide you guys with nursing related updates/ news from reliable sources, aid in uniting the voice of nurses for cause and change and above all be a safe place where nurses can connect.

We are currently aligning meaningful partnerships to help aid in the fight and would love your input! Let us know how you are helping turn the tide, your fears and frustrations and how you’re staying encouraged or simply coping.

United we stand, divided we fall.

tips for surving nursing school

Top 10 Tips for Surviving Nursing School Clinical

If you’ve started clinical, Congrats! Getting your clinical start means you’re progressing through your labs and courses successfully. This is an exciting time begin exploring the different facets and specialties in nursing and apply some real hands-on skills. Additionally, clinical also allows a better feel for what area of nursing best resonates with you and where you might be interested in working in the near future. But make no mistake, getting to this point is just the beginning. 

Check out these proven tips below on how to get a guaranteed “pass” at clinical.

1.  Eat a Good Breakfast & Bring Snacks

If you’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it twice. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day and proper nutrition will play a major role in your clinical success. Research shows that your brain uses about 20% of your body’s energy or about 320 calories for thinking alone! That said store up on energy with a well rounded breakfast that will fuel you adequately into your next meal. Unfortunately,  clinical don’t lend themselves to frequent breaks and require a ton of standing on your feet.

2. Be On Time

First impressions really are everything and consistency is key. This is not the time to forget to set the alarm or be tardy. The aforementioned behaviors can leave a negative impression on your clinical instructor, disrupts the flow of the group and can cause you to get a clinical failure. That said, you  want your first and ongoing encounters to be positive ones. Arrive promptly at your clinical site each and every time.

3. Get Adequate Rest

Long shifts are hard but they can be brutal for new comers who aren’t used to typical healthcare hours. Clinical can often last anywhere from 6 to 12 hours but generally last around the latter. Getting to bed early the night before clinical is a great way to get a head start on your big day and will help ensure you show up alert, well rested and energized for the day.

4. Come Prepared & Be Pop Quiz Ready

If you’ve not yet started clinical you’ve probably heard that your instructor may likely put you on the spot with what seems like random questions about your patients, medications and anything else they think you should know. If your lucky you’ll be allowed to visit the unit prior to clinical to gather all pertinent patient info ahead of time. If not, be sure to bring your assessment book, pocket sized drug guides, resources and apps for quick references when you have down time.

nursing school study tips

5. Phone & Social Media Etiquette

Although mobile phones have become a huge part of our lives, it goes without saying that clinical is not the place to be on it and could be the cause of a clinical failure. Be sure to turn your phone on silent or consider leaving it in your car or assigned area with your belongings. If you have to be on standby for a potential emergency call, discuss this with your instructor up front. If a call must be taken, leave from direct patient settings to do so. HIPAA is real. Think twice before sharing content from the hospital setting. Also remember, geotagging your images and using hospital hashtags will make it easy for the hospital’s marketing team to identify you.

6. All Clinical Sites Aren’t Created Equal- Be Open Minded 

Every clinical setting will be different. Location, patient population, resources and access to care amongst other things can play a role in your clinical experience. Some facilities may lack amenities while others appear cush and pristine. Additionally, the type of facility your clinical is at may drive the things you’re able to see and do. For example, teaching and academic institutions are geared towards educating health professionals and tend to have more observation and learning opportunities. Regardless of the site, remember to show kindness, cultural competence and professionalism at all times.

7. Advocate for Your Own learning

The hard truth is that you may not see half of what you’ve learned in class or lab while at clinical. However, when opportunities present themselves for additional learning or observation jump at the chance. Depending on the facility and unit size, chances such as this may be far and few in between. Don’t be shy- reversely if there are things you’d like to see, don’t hesitate to mention it to your instructor or nurse as they are aware of the patients on the floor and can help facilitate your request if possible.

8. Be Ethical

If for some reason you find yourself in a situation where you feel there may possibly be a chance you’ve done something that could harm a patient, be sure to speak up. No one is perfect and there is no shame in admitting a mistake. Further, don’t let fear or embarrassment stop you from doing the right thing. Keep in mind the patient’s safety is the top priority. Reversely, If you see a fellow classmate doing something wrong that could harm a patient don’t hesitate to speak up and advocate for the patient’s safety.

9. Treat Each Day of Clinical as a Potential Job Interview

If you fall in love with a unit during clinical be sure to do everything in your power to stand out to the leadership team. Introduce yourself to the supervisors and build report with the nurses. Go a step further and put yourself out there by asking questions, going the extra mile for your patients and showing your genuine interest in the unit. This can most definitely lead to you landing your preferred senior practicum placement and even more, can help you land your dream job.

10. Don’t Take it Personal 

Clinical can come with an array of ups and downs. Some patients will refuse students while others welcome them with open arms. Some nurses will take you under their wing and others might not. You may get your clinical site preference or your luck of the draw may land you at your last choice. If for some reason don’t mesh well with your clinical instructor try setting up a time to meet with them one on one. If there’s no resolve after that, its probably a good idea to speak with your counselor or instructor at school so that they are aware sooner than later. Above all, don’t take it personal and focus on what you can control. Do your best and approach each day with a new perspective.

Looking for more ways to be prepared? Here’s some additional helpful resources to help you succeed in your nursing career:

https://thenurselink.com/how-to-effectively-study-for-nursing-school-exams/

https://thenurselink.com/how-to-manage-your-time-in-nursing-school/

https://nurse.org/articles/what-to-expect-in-clinicals/

Top Tips for Surviving Nursing School Clinical

nursing school clinicals study tip

If you’ve started clinical, Congrats! Getting your clinical start means you’re progressing through your labs and courses successfully. This is an exciting time begin exploring the different facets and specialties in nursing and apply some real hands-on skills. Additionally, clinical also allows a better feel for what area of nursing best resonates with you and where you might be interested in working in the near future. But make no mistake, getting to this point is just the beginning. 

Check out these proven tips below on how to get a guaranteed “pass” at clinical.

1.  Eat a Good Breakfast & Bring Snacks

If you’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it twice. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day and proper nutrition will play a major role in your clinical success. Research shows that your brain uses about 20% of your body’s energy or about 320 calories for thinking alone! That said store up on energy with a well rounded breakfast that will fuel you adequately into your next meal. Unfortunately,  clinical don’t lend themselves to frequent breaks and require a ton of standing on your feet.

2. Be On Time

First impressions really are everything and consistency is key. This is not the time to forget to set the alarm or be tardy. The aforementioned behaviors can leave a negative impression on your clinical instructor, disrupts the flow of the group and can cause you to get a clinical failure. That said, you  want your first and ongoing encounters to be positive ones. Arrive promptly at your clinical site each and every time. 

3. Get Adequate Rest

Long shifts are hard but they can be brutal for new comers who aren’t used to typical healthcare hours. Clinical can often last anywhere from 6 to 12 hours but generally last around the latter. Getting to bed early the night before clinical is a great way to get a head start on your big day and will help ensure you show up alert, well rested and energized for the day. 

4. Come Prepared & Be Pop Quiz Ready

If you’ve not yet started clinical you’ve probably heard that your instructor may likely put you on the spot with what seems like random questions about your patients, medications and anything else they think you should know. If your lucky you’ll be allowed to visit the unit prior to clinical to gather all pertinent patient info ahead of time. If not, be sure to bring your assessment book, pocket sized drug guides, resources and apps for quick references when you have down time. 

nursing school study tips

5. Phone & Social Media Etiquette

Although mobile phones have become a huge part of our lives, it goes without saying that clinical is not the place to be on it and could be the cause of a clinical failure. Be sure to turn your phone on silent or consider leaving it in your car or assigned area with your belongings. If you have to be on standby for a potential emergency call, discuss this with your instructor up front. If a call must be taken, leave from direct patient settings to do so. HIPAA is real. Think twice before sharing content from the hospital setting. Also remember, geotagging your images and using hospital hashtags will make it easy for the hospital’s marketing team to identify you. 

6. All Clinical Sites Aren’t Created Equal- Be Open Minded 

Every clinical setting will be different. Location, patient population, resources and access to care amongst other things can play a role in your clinical experience. Some facilities may lack amenities while others appear cush and pristine. Additionally, the type of facility your clinical is at may drive the things you’re able to see and do. For example, teaching and academic institutions are geared towards educating health professionals and tend to have more observation and learning opportunities. Regardless of the site, remember to show kindness, cultural competence and professionalism at all times. 

7. Advocate for Your Own learning

The hard truth is that you may not see half of what you’ve learned in class or lab while at clinical. However, when opportunities present themselves for additional learning or observation jump at the chance. Depending on the facility and unit size, chances such as this may be far and few in between. Don’t be shy- reversely if there are things you’d like to see, don’t hesitate to mention it to your instructor or nurse as they are aware of the patients on the floor and can help facilitate your request if possible. 

8. Be Ethical

If for some reason you find yourself in a situation where you feel there may possibly be a chance you’ve done something that could harm a patient, be sure to speak up. No one is perfect and there is no shame in admitting a mistake. Further, don’t let fear or embarrassment stop you from doing the right thing. Keep in mind the patient’s safety is the top priority. Reversely, If you see a fellow classmate doing something wrong that could harm a patient don’t hesitate to speak up and advocate for the patient’s safety. 

9. Treat Each Day of Clinical as a Potential Job Interview

If you fall in love with a unit during clinical be sure to do everything in your power to stand out to the leadership team. Introduce yourself to the supervisors and build report with the nurses. Go a step further and put yourself out there by asking questions, going the extra mile for your patients and showing your genuine interest in the unit. This can most definitely lead to you landing your preferred senior practicum placement and even more, can help you land your dream job.

10. Don’t Take it Personal 

Clinical can come with an array of ups and downs. Some patients will refuse students while others welcome them with open arms. Some nurses will take you under their wing and others might not. You may get your clinical site preference or your luck of the draw may land you at your last choice. If for some reason don’t mesh well with your clinical instructor try setting up a time to meet with them one on one. If there’s no resolve after that, its probably a good idea to speak with your counselor or instructor at school so that they are aware sooner than later. Above all, don’t take it personal and focus on what you can control. Do your best and approach each day with a new perspective.

top five tips for how to manage your time in nursing school

How to Manage Your Time In Nursing School

Whether your semester has just begun or your classes are in full swing, it’s never too late to revise your strategy and give your time management approach a reality check. Nursing school can be overwhelming and push you in ways you didn’t know you could be challenged. Getting to the finish line will not be easy but a clear and deliberate plan of action will help you get there unscathed.

 

TIME EFFICIENCY

In nursing school, everything else becomes secondary to studying. Create a daily and or hourly schedule and stick to it to be the most efficient. An hour by hour plan will help tremendously in keeping you on track to hit your daily milestones. In addition, it will be helpful to get conditioned to studying first before everything else. On days when on site classes are held, commuters should consider staying on campus to complete studying for the day instead of wasting precious time in stop and go traffic. If you stay on campus, avoid trips back and forth between classes to the your room and use small breaks to stick it out in the library. Keep flash cards on hand for quick study breaks when your schedule allows. Downloading audio lectures can be helpful for learning on the go and can be accessed on your headset or in the car. Parents should try to maximize time when children are sleeping or at school and use this time to study also. Lastly use weekends to meal prep, do house chores, prepare for the week and of course study!

 

STAYING ORGANIZED 

Getting organized can drastically change your nursing school experience for the better and create more time for focused learning.. Allocating specific folders, binders and bags for each class or day of the week will help you tremendously. Printing the syllabi for each course, outlining major deadlines and noting all test and assignment dates can be lifesaving. Large calendars are also great for providing a monthly view of classes, assignments, tests and clinicals. Small planners  can provide a great weekly view of your obligations and phone reminders can be essential. Organization will allow you the space and peace of mind to study. Preparing class and clinical materials ahead of time can be lifesaving. 

 

DEVELOP AN EFFECTIVE STUDY STRATEGY

Undoubtedly, studying is the most time intensive task in nursing school. There’s an exorbitant amount of info to read, digest and retain and seemingly not enough time in the day to tackle it all. Study at times that you are most energized and receptive. Create a dedicated area in your home that’s conducive to studying helps to set the tone and environment for optimal learning that’s free of distractions. It is also  important to master the skill of intaking and dumping information. Unlike your pre-nursing courses, being super detailed oriented could actually work against you in nursing school. After your first test, there should be an analysis of the materials you covered as it relates to what you were actually tested on. Let this information guide your future study habits per course. Your learning style may be auditory or visual; however, most people study best in groups and are able to grasp concepts from peers more concisely. Lastly, grab a few classmates with similar schedules to form a study group and test your knowledge by explaining and teaching one another.

 

KEEP SOCIAL TO A MINIMUM

“Do what you have to now  so you can do what you want later.” While cliche, the aforementioned expression holds true. Nursing school is no joke and is a real life commitment and sacrifice of time. Depending on the rigidity of your program, you may want to consider minimizing social outings for the duration of your program. This does not mean that you can’t have a life or shouldn’t see your friends and family; however, it does mean you should be doing so a lot less. Remember, self-care is a huge component of keeping your sanity during this challenging time.  Be sure to prioritize time for things that make you happy, recharge your energy and allow you to step away for mental breaks. Schedule your social time in advance to be sure your interactions are not becoming distractions to your focus and productivity. Also, it may not be a bad idea to limit time on social media as well. You can use various apps to track and limit your usage.

ACCOUNTABILITY PARTNER

In nursing school you have countless assignments, deadlines, tests and obligations. In this environment a hectic schedule can get the best of them despite proper planning and time management. Therefore, having a human reminder  can really go a long way. Identifying a buddy in the program will be gold and in addition to helping you stay on top of all your deadlines, they can provide moral support and encouragement which can improve your nursing school experience drastically. 

How to Effectively Study For Nursing School Exams

Entry into nursing school comes with many new and exciting challenges – including a brand new way of studying! Beware, there are no test like nursing school tests. All memes aside, the exams in nursing school are just different and so should the way you prepare for them. With the sleepless nights and last-minute cram sessions that many of you will face in the upcoming weeks, developing study habits that will help you succeed on nursing school exams can be quite overwhelming. After consulting with expert nurse educators to find out what helps their students soar on exams, we’ve come up with these helpful study tips and we want to share them with you! 


Here are five ways to study for nursing school exam success:

 

ORGANIZE AND REVIEW ALL RESOURCES PROVIDED


Nurse educators, instructors and professors work diligently to supply their students with many additional resources to help facilitate learning. If you have not already done so, you should organize all of the supplemental information and give it a thorough review, along with your course textbooks. This will help to greatly improve and validate your understanding of the nursing concepts and content that will show up later on your exams. Be sure to take the initiative to do this on a weekly basis, regardless of how much you dread the tedious task of organizing your binders and reading through every single word. Just think of it this way – the worst thing that can happen is that you might just learn something new!

READ, WRITE, DO AND REDO


When it comes to nursing school exams, you must be well-prepared to succeed. In fact, it’s nearly impossible to over-prepare. One way that you can be sure to score well is to read, write, and review nursing content outside of classroom hours. Ever hear the saying “Practice makes perfect”? This also applies to absorbing the massive amounts of nursing content that you’ll need to know for your exams. A few practical recommendations include reading your textbooks and supplemental material, writing out key points and concepts, and practicing the ability to recall the information when challenged. Whether you choose to use flashcards or a notebook, writing the information down, then challenging yourself to recall the information, it is a great way to study for nursing school exams.

FOCUS ON WEAK AREAS OF UNDERSTANDING


Let’s face it – we all have our favorite topics when it comes to nursing content. Some students love labor and delivery, while others love cardiovascular nursing, and in these cases, students usually score well on related questions. The reality is that most nursing exams are complex and often cumulative, which may include several concepts that you may find challenging. By concentrating on the content that you find most challenging first, then reviewing the easier content after you’ve mastered the more challenging topics, you will improve your chance of rocking the exam. Don’t get distracted by your excitement for one particular area of nursing while you’re in school. You need to master all of the nursing school content to be successful – so tackle the hard stuff first, so you can have the opportunity to stay in the running of becoming a nurse!


TEACH YOUR DOG, CAT, FRIENDS, FAMILY – EVERYONE! 


Did you know that teaching is the highest form of understanding? This study technique helps to ensure that you are ready to ace your upcoming nursing school exams. By creating lesson plans with the content that is expected to be on your exams, you will be sure to cover all of the essentials during your teachings. You should create high-level test questions to ask your audience during your teachings, and be sure to restate the key points and rationale regularly to emphasize comprension. Some students find that being a student tutor is a great way to gain additional exposure to teaching and content mastery. Either as a tutor or part of a study group, nursing students who adopt teaching as a method for exam preparation often do very well on their exams.

FREQUENT & SHORT STUDY SESSIONS ARE BEST

 

It’s important to understand that studying for nursing school exams is more like a marathon not a sprint. Students who participate in extensive cram sessions the night before an exam are less likely to score well. Instead of procrastinating until the night before an exam to study, it is recommended that you study in frequent intervals for no more than three-to-four hours per study session. You may hold study sessions two or three times per day for several weeks leading up to an exam, but be sure to keep the sessions limited to only a few hours at a time. During the time in between studying, make sure to engage in activities that are healthy and relaxing – such as sharing a well balanced meal with family, exercising, or getting out of the house.

 

We hope that you find these five study tips helpful during your nursing school journey. Be sure to share this post with your nursing school peers, and contribute to this discussion by leaving your thoughts in the comments section below!

 

Geriatric Nursing: The True Underdog of the Healthcare Field

From the time I began my nursing career, I knew that I would work in Geriatrics. When expressing this to many of my friends, colleagues and even professors I received the astounding response “Why?”. Many nurses I meet have a goal of working in Pediatrics or OB so that they can be a part of the innocence and beauty associated with childhood, but many view geriatrics as the unglamorous world of bedpans and adult briefs! When I am tasked with answering the questioning of my field choice I immediately begin expressing how I possess a deeply rooted passion for the geriatric population that sometimes can’t be explained by words
As a child, I was raised by my Great Grandmother. The generational gap between us presented many problems and I probably wasn’t participating in some of the same after school and weekend activities as my peers. My great grandmother is a true saint spent most of her time visiting nursing homes to volunteer and visit her family members and friends that were in facilities. During this time I had the opportunity to volunteer as well. Although I was a small child, I connected with the residents in the homes we visited and they took to me and enjoyed my weekly visits. I can truly say that this experience led me to where I am now. As my great grandmother grew older I eventually had to move with my mom and I then found myself visiting my grandmother to take care of her. Just as she had dedicated her life to helping others I found that I became passionate about caring for her. Up until her recent death I vowed to make her golden years her best years.
 

Today I am proud to say that I have dedicated most of my nursing career to geriatrics. Right out of high school I became a Certified Nursing Assistant and worked in a nursing home as well as a Geriatric Psychiatry Unit. After graduating from nursing school my professors advised me to spend at least one year in the Emergency Department so that I can gain skills to prepare me for my Geriatric career. I literally completed one year and then began working in the Home Health setting where my clients were all 65 and older. I enjoyed educating seniors about chronic conditions and each visit felt like a visit to Grandmas! Recently, I completed my Masters and became an Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner (NP). I currently work in a long term care facility in the specialty of Geriatric Psychiatry. I provide medication management of psychotropic drugs to the residents there. I also educate the staff in the facility on non-pharmacological methods for handling conditions such as dementia. I work tirelessly to ensure that the facility is in compliance with current Medicare Guidelines and prepare them for visits with state agencies. Not a moment goes by that I don’t feel like I am walking in my purpose!

Geriatrics is a field that often is forgotten and I must say I do not see how! I find my job to be very rewarding and I often feel connected to the patients I serve. The benefits of working with this population are vast. There is a true need for those passionate about working with this very vulnerable population. There is always an opportunity to teach these patients, but what is most rewarding is that they often teach you! I find that my patients are at a place in there lives where they may require assistance with care, but their wisdom simply amazes me.

The American Association of Nurse Practitioners reports that, “there are more than 270,000 nurse practitioners (NPs) licensed in the U.S., however, only 1.8% of those providers are certified in Geriatrics (2018 AANP National Nurse Practitioner Sample Survey).
These figures are very alarming considering that,  “one in 5 Americans will be eligible for Medicare by 2030, with people 65 and older expected to account for almost 20 percent of the nation’s population by then” (Magaly Olivero, 2015). Equipped with this information, I feel that there is a need to access the reasons that providers do not choose Geriatrics. Wether it is related to a lack of knowledge about the field that is not being addressed in nursing programs or a fear of the field that also needs to be addressed through clinical rotations or patient experience opportunities, we as providers owe it to these individuals to address the need.

As with any field, you have to find the area that most interests you, but I encourage anyone that finds geriatrics the least bit interesting to investigate a career in the field! If you are looking for something that is challenging and structured this is a great fit. The field is mostly preventative and if you are like me and love the aspect of preventing health conditions you will find yourself constantly educating, patients, staff and family members and working to connect your patients with the many resources available to them. Another bonus is that you can work in a variety of settings including hospitals, home health, long term care facilities, assisted living, nonprofit organizations and so on. There is currently a huge demand for geriatric providers and I can guarantee that working in the field will not only be a career reward but also a personal one that will inspire the values of humility and advocacy.

Breonna Leon is a Geriatric Nurse Practitioner in the Atlanta Area who currently serves as a consultant for long term care facilities in the specialty of Geriatric Psychiatry. She holds a M.S. in Adult-Gerontology Primary Care from George Washington University. Breonnabelieves in providing care that is both patient focused and in accordance with the most recent evidence based practice. She works tirelessly to ensure that this vulnerable population is cared for in ways that are holistic in nature. You can find Breonna on Instagram  and reach her via email

Reality Shock: What They Didn’t Teach You in Nursing School

Reality shock is something that you may have heard about in nursing school, but know very little about. Most nursing programs do not adequately prepare their students with coping mechanisms to effectively manage each phase of reality shock. 

Once you start your new job as a nurse, having straight A’s or being the most popular student among your professors won’t matter. You’ll have to establish credibility among all your new colleagues and that’s not an easy task. In fact, it can be shocking and quite intimidating.

Let’s discuss what reality shock is, and tips for managing each phase.

The Four Phases of Reality Shock In Nursing

The idea of reality shock is applied to those who are new to the nursing profession or new to a nursing speciality, where they go through a learning and growing transition. This process has four phases: honeymoon, shock, recovery, and resolution.

 

Honeymoon Phase

The honeymoon phase is a period of excitement for new graduates. You may be very excited to be joining the profession and find yourself eager to learn as much as possible. You will be guided by your desire to do your very best and become confident in your new roles and responsibilities. 

Tip: It is important to establish working relationships where trust and respect are demonstrated between you and your preceptors during this phase. This will help to minimize complications in the following phases of reality shock.

 

Shock Phase

The new nurse is the most vulnerable in the second phase – the shock phase, as this is when negative feelings towards your new role may surface. This is often when the new nurse realizes that the expectation of their new role is inconsistent with the day-to-day responsibilities and work flow. When nurses find themselves in the shock phase, they are at risk to quit, leave their unit, or experience burn out.

Tip: Critical strategies to ease through the shock phase include: finding a mentor for guidance, taking care of yourself physically and emotionally, being sure to get adequate sleep, eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly and having fun with family and friends. It is also essential that you develop a strong support network, and workplace buddies that have your back.

 

Recovery Phase

During the recovery phase, new nurses begin an upward climb back to the positive side. Now able to  consider all sides of your new role as a nurse, you will begin to see the job realities with a more open perspective. You can begin to accept the challenges of your day-to-day responsibilities, and find creative solutions to barriers in providing safe and effective nursing care. 

Tip: To ensure that you do not move back to the shock phase, it is important to seek out constructive criticism, and let your preceptors and mentors know where you are having trouble adjusting. Seek out clarification, and be sure to always work within your limitations. Don’t be afraid to admit that you don’t know. Once you become confident in your roles and responsibilities, you will move to the resolution phase. 

 

Resolution Phase

The fourth and final stage, which is typically after one year of nursing experience, is the resolution phase. During the resolution phase the nurse fully understands their role and fully contributes to the delivery of safe and effective patient care. 

Tip: It is important that you continue to focus on the positive aspects of your job in order to maintain ongoing satisfaction and career success. Engage in continuing education by earning an advanced degree, or becoming certified. When you remain engaged in your own professional development, you are sure to find fulfillment within the nursing profession. 

 

Here are some additional coping skills that you may find helpful as you transition into your new role as a nurse:

Focus on mastering your skills

Making sure that your nursing skills are being performed in the way that follows facility and state regulations will help you to avoid mistakes and help to build confidence. The first six months to a year is an important time for you to work on improving your ability to perform all client care and administrative skills independently, thus boosting your confidence and satisfaction within your new role.

Seek Guidance from experienced nurses 

Just because you finished orientation at your new job does not mean that you are all alone in providing client care. In fact, nursing is always a team effort, and you are encouraged to seek guidance and resource experienced nursing staff to help you when you need it.

When juggling the complex treatments, and patient care of today’s healthcare system, we all rely on one another to deliver the safest and most effective client care possible. Be sure to identify your learning needs as they arise and seek the expert guidance you will need to feel confident in your roles and responsibilities.

Find a nursing specialty that fits 

Not all nursing specialty areas are created equal. The expectations and responsibilities of nurses in an emergency department are very different than those of a medical-surgical unit. In many cases, new graduate nurses are eager to begin working and accept the first specialty that they are offered.

In the event that you find yourself really struggling with the specialty you are working in, be sure to discuss your concerns with your supervisor before deciding to quit. They will be able to identify your struggles and may offer effective coping strategies and/or specialty alternatives accordingly. Switching specialties within the first six months to a year is quite common, and many times healthcare facilities will accommodate your requests to keep you on staff.

We hope that these tips for managing reality shock help you as you transition from student nurse to professional nurse. If you have any additional tips you’d like to share, please leave your thoughts in the comments section below!